top of page
Search

Protein is damaging your arteries!

That’s the basis of an article that recently appeared in a New York newspaper based on a recent “study” that claimed too much protein from animal foods would cause lots of arterial and cardiovascular issues.


Guess what they used for the “animal protein” in this study? 

Nestle Boost Plus

Here are the ingredients in that product:


WATER, GLUCOSE SYRUP, SUGAR, VEGETABLE OIL (CANOLA, HIGH OLEIC SUNFLOWER, CORN), MILK PROTEIN CONCENTRATE, AND LESS THAN 2% OF COCOA PROCESSED WITH ALKALI, SOY PROTEIN ISOLATE, CALCIUM CASEINATE, SODIUM CASEINATE, VITAMINS AND MINERALS‡, GUM ACACIA, FRUCTOOLIGOSACCHARIDES, INULIN (FROM CHICORY), SOY LECITHIN, SALT, CARRAGEENAN, NATURAL AND ARTIFICIAL FLAVOR


Is anyone shocked that eating ultra-processed garbage Nestle (obligatory F**k Nestle, the owners of Garden of Life, Vital Proteins, Pure Encapsulations, and a bunch more) products every day,  full of awful ingredients, would lead to problems with cardiovascular health? This has nothing to do with animal proteins (or protein in general) and everything to do with the common knowledge that junk food, regardless of whether it is marketed as health food, is not good for you. I can feel my blood pressure going up from how angry this crap makes me.

Boycott Nestle

Rooted Nutrition is proud to be, and always will be, a Nestle free zone!


This is just one more “study” in a long line of extremely shoddy “research” done to make people fearful of some of the most nourishing, nutrient-dense, healthy foods. If you want a complete history of how we came to fear animal fats and proteins unnecessarily, check out this awesome book by journalist Nina Teicholz, The Big Fat Suprise.


It’s this type of garbage “science” and reporting that gives nutritional research a bad name. There are so many flawed nutritional studies based on dietary recall, industry-funded stuff with lots of bias, and poor methodology. Nutritional science needs a complete overhaul because, as the saying goes, garbage in, garbage out. 


The next time you see a headline online or in a magazine or newspaper with an outlandish health or nutrition claim based on a new “study,” remember that it’s probably completely false or misleading because crazy headlines get the most attention, which leads to the most profit. 

High blood pressure readings

My blood pressure numbers, whenever terrible "research" like this comes out.

Comments


bottom of page